New Works – Summer 2016

Bucksbaum Campus Phase 2 – In progress June, 2016
Aspen Music Festival and School, Castle Creek, Aspen

40BWORKS serves as the Landscape Architect for Phase 2 of the Bucksbaum Campus of the Aspen Music Festival and School, designed by Harry Teague, Architects. Phase 2 involved the construction of a composition of new buildings around the significant large ponds. The entire central area of the Campus is primarily a pedestrian environment.
IMG_9135 While the buildings are complete, planting on Campus is still in progress. Here, freshly-placed sod gleams.
IMG_9129 Ever-changing reflections in the ponds create another dimension of experience (during construction).
IMG_9149 Planting in Phase 1 is taking hold, restoring the wild natural feel of the riparian environment surrounding Castle Creek as it runs through Campus.
IMG_9125 It’s exciting to see wildflowers like this Firecracker Penstemon, and Rosy Paintbrush (not shown) blooming in the Campus specific wildflower mix, sown in Phase 1.

Pitkin County Library, Aspen – Opening Celebration, June 19

I worked on the Pitkin County Library Expansion project when I was at Design Workshop. I led a phase of planning approvals, landscape conceptual and schematic design and design development. The construction drawing and observation phase was completed by Design Workshop.
IMG_9009 It was a rewarding experience to attend the opening celebration and congratulate board members, library and county staff, and consultants. All worked with dedication to evolve the early vision into a constructed reality for the entire community and visitors.
IMG_9012 The library expansion opens on to a public plaza, merging indoor with outdoor space. In particular, the children’s room has a small sunken garden amphitheater for outdoor reading and activities.
IMG_9018 Patrons, board members and the community are excited to explore this new facility for the 22nd century!
IMG_9021 The roof reading garden features great views over the public plaza and towards the town and mountains.

Earthwise Connections

This post will help you contact me and also suggests a way to reuse materials.

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I created my business contact information on an eco-friendly self-inking stamp.
This allows me to:
a) share the information with others by simply stamping material they are already using;
or
b) stamp material that has previously been used.
I saved the cardboard box packaging from my groceries that included trail bars and teas, laid it flat, and cut business card shapes. Then I stamped them.

These are a few examples:
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IMG_3529IMG_3344IMG_3530

Being Human in Nature

When on the trail, my inspirational backpacking partner and I would often contemplate the beauty of our minimalist lifestyle and our raised awareness of being a human in nature. Casey Lyons captured that feeling in these excerpts from his recent article:

“Then one morning, you open your tent door and you know, sure as dew glistens in the sun, that you are just exactly where you should be. There’s no distinction between you and the woods and the trail, because you are all part of the same bigger organism…

You’re floored by the way a tree bark looks when the afternoon shadows give it infinite depth, the sight of a caterpillar silhouetted through a beech leaf, the way a summer cloudburst sounds when you can’t get out of it and don’t care, because being wet has been a condition of life forever and now it’s part of yours, too.”

Lyons, Casey. “More is better: Long-distance hiking.” Backpacker June 2014: Pages 12-14.

Excerpt from Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot

ā€œLook again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.ā€
ā€• Sagan, Carl (1994). Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space. New York: Random House.